New Horizons Get Schooled Blog

Use the Rotate View tool for more fluent image editing (Photoshop CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015/CC 2017)

Posted on 9/13/18 10:26 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop

If you’re looking for a handy tool to make your image editing easier, try the Rotate View tool. With the Rotate View tool you can rotate your image preview (but not the image), so you can access your image from different angles, making touch up work less cumbersome. To try it out, select the Rotate View tool from the Tools panel. (It resides in the same tool spot as the Hand tool, so if you don’t see it, click and hold the Hand tool then choose the Rotate View tool from the pop-up.) Click on the image and drag in a circular motion to rotate the image preview. Notice the preview in the Layers panel is still in the original position! Edit your image, clicking and dragging the image to rotate more if needed. When you want to put the image back to its original position, press Escape. Or, if the Rotate View tool is still selected, click the Reset View button on the tool options bar.

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Enable Smoothing for greater brush painting control (Photoshop 2018)

Posted on 7/31/18 9:05 AM by New Horizons in photoshop, in tips and tricks

If you’ve ever tried to draw with the brush tool—yes, even with a stylus—you know how cumbersome and unforgiving Photoshop can be. CC 2018’s Smoothing feature makes this task a lot easier. When you paint with Smoothing enabled, you’ll notice a pink guide, also called a string, that runs from the painted stroke to your brush tip. This string plays a crucial part in the tool’s functionality.

Select the Brush tool (or Pencil, Mixer Brush, or Eraser tool) from the Tools panel and set your color and brush tip options. The Smoothing option is enabled by default. Adjust the Smoothing slider (from 0, which is no smoothing, to 100 which is maximum smoothing) on the tool Options bar to change the amount Photoshop smoothens the stroke. Then, click on the gear icon next to the Smoothing slider to choose from the different smoothing options:

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Enhance your text with an attractive image (Illustrator CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015/CC 2017/CC 2018)

Posted on 7/17/18 9:24 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop, in Tips & Tricks

Solid colored text just doesn’t have the same artistic appeal as text filled with a background image or texture, such as wood grain, a painted background, or even a sunset. Background images are plentiful on stock art websites and easy to snap with your camera or cell phone, so there should be no trouble coming up with an interesting image.

To add an image to text, first set some type in a font that is thick enough to display an image inside. Then set both the foreground and background color to none. Select the Draw Inside button at the base of the Tools panel, and Illustrator will display a dotted line around the bounding box corners. Choose File > Place, navigate to the image you wish to place inside the text, and click Place. Reposition the text over the image as needed, select the Draw Normal button at the base of the Tools panel, and you’re done!

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Put a copyright notice in your file’s metadata for added protection (Photoshop CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015/CC 2017/CC 2018)

Posted on 7/17/18 9:09 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop, in Tips & Tricks

If you put your images online, you should protect your digital rights with a copyright. Even if you watermark your images, a copyright notice in your file’s metadata is another simple way to tag your photo as your own. Metadata is not visible in the image—it’s embedded in the file information, and it’s easy to access in Photoshop.

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Remove telephone wires and other eyesores with the Healing Brush tool (Photoshop CC/CC 2014/CC 2015/CC 2017/CC 2018)

Posted on 12/8/17 2:55 PM by Get Schooled in photoshop

Everyone’s moving to wireless these days, so why not your photographs? Electric wires spanning across an image are a real eyesore—but don’t despair. You can banish them with Photoshop’s Healing Brush tool!

For example, to digitally remove utility-pole wires from a photo, add a new layer above the layer you wish to edit. Select the Healing Brush tool from the Tools panel, and choose Current & Below from the Sample pop-up menu. This option enables you to sample edits from the original layer but apply edited pixels to the new layer, preserving the original. Adjust the brush size to suit the size of the area you wish to heal. In the case of removing wires, you need a brush size large enough to cover the individual wires, but not too large where you sample more pixel data then necessary. [Option]-click ([Alt]-click in Windows) an area of the sky beside one of the wires, and then release. Click on the wire next to where you sampled pixels, and Photoshop replaces the wire with pixels that match and blend into the surrounding area.

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Use the Rotate View tool for more fluent image editing (Photoshop CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015/CC 2017)

Posted on 2/13/17 8:31 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop

If you’re looking for a handy tool to make your image editing easier, try the Rotate View tool. With the Rotate View tool you can rotate your image preview (but not the image), so you can access your image from different angles, making touch up work less cumbersome. To try it out, select the Rotate View tool from the Tools panel. (It resides in the same tool spot as the Hand tool, so if you don’t see it, click and hold the Hand tool then choose the Rotate View tool from the pop-up.) Click on the image and drag in a circular motion to rotate the image preview. Notice the preview in the Layers panel is still in the original position! Edit your image, clicking and dragging the image to rotate more if needed. When you want to put the image back to its original position, press Escape. Or, if the Rotate View tool is still selected, click the Reset View button on the tool options bar.

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Enhance your composition by cropping with the Rule of Thirds (Photoshop CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015)

Posted on 1/16/17 12:04 PM by Get Schooled in photoshop

Oftentimes a less-than-stellar composition can be made better simply by cropping the image! And, there is a built-in feature to the Crop tool that allows you to see the Rule of Thirds grid overlay on your image while you crop. The general concept behind the Rule of Thirds is that if you visually separate your image into nine equal parts with a grid, your main point of interest should lie on one of the intersecting grid lines, because that’s where the viewer’s eye is likely to be drawn. To crop using the Rule of Thirds grid overlay, choose the Crop tool from the Tools panel, and choose Rule of Thirds from the overlay options pop-up menu on the tool options bar. Click and drag a marquee on your image in the size you want to crop, then click and drag to move the crop box until a focal point of your image sits beneath one of the intersecting lines. Double-click to commit the crop, and enjoy your more pleasing composition!

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Make a new document size the same as another—super quick! (Photoshop CS5/CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015)

Posted on 7/19/16 9:23 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop

If you want to match a new document’s image size and resolution to an existing one, there’s a simple way to do so. With your existing document open and active, press [command]A ([Ctrl]A in Windows) to Select All, and then [command]C ([Ctrl]C) to Copy. Don’t worry; you don’t have to paste the image, but copying the image captures all the image details–including the image size and resolution–to the clipboard. Now choose [command]N ([Ctrl]N in Windows) and Photoshop opens the New Document dialog box with the image size values of the existing document filled in. Just click OK or press [Enter] and you’re good to go!

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Use This Trick to Apply Non-Destructive Dodge and Burn Edits (Photoshop CS5/CS6/CC/CC 2014/CC 2015)

Posted on 3/21/16 3:51 PM by Get Schooled in photoshop

The Dodge and Burn tools were designed to mimic those used in traditional dark rooms, allowing you to darken or lighten areas in a photo with precision control. Unfortunately, because there aren't adjustment layers for these tools, any edits you make are destructive to the layer. Here is a clever workaround. First, create a new layer above the layer you wish to edit. Choose Edit > Fill and select 50% Gray from the Contents pop-up menu. Set the layer blending mode to Overlay. Now, working on the 50% Gray layer, select the Dodge or Burn tool from the Tools panel and dodge and burn your photo to perfection!

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Create a New Swatch Set from a Web File (Photoshop CC/CC 2014/CC 2015)

Posted on 2/25/16 8:07 AM by Get Schooled in photoshop

There are a number of roundabout ways to create a color palette in Photoshop. But if you often match the color schemes of graphics and web pages, you'll want a straightforward method to keep the color of your designs consistent. Nothing beats this method when you already have specific content in the form of an HTML, HTM, CSS, or SVG file. Choose Window > Swatches to display the Swatches panel, and then click on the triangle in the top right corner to open the options menu. Select Load Swatches if you want to add swatches to your current set, or choose Replace Swatches if you want to load a new set replacing your current set. In the Load dialog box, click on the file format type pop-up menu at the bottom right corner of the dialog box and choose the file type you are opening. (For instance, if you are going to load swatches from an HTML page, then select HTML from the pop-up menu.) Navigate to your file and click Load, and Photoshop will add swatches from that file to the Swatches panel.

0 CommentsContinue Reading →

Search by Topic

    Lists by Topic

    see all

    Knowledge Ninjas

    a web-based service that allows software application end users to access a subject matter expert in real-time via a chat interface to resolve questions or problems they encounter in their specific software.

     

    Subscribe